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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
to keep the troops home for good. >> the pentagon came out with new defense guidance in january 2012, which reflected the obama administration's understanding that budgets were going to be constrained first. and that second, the united states would not be likely to fight anymore wars like iraq or afghanistan in the near future, or the next decade or so. >> the point is that the american appetite for global intervention is going to decrease. there aren't many americans that want to keep going in afghanistan after 2014. there aren't many americans that are gonna want to go into iraq even given its importance in terms of global energy and oil. >> i think that reflects an understanding of where the country is. the u.s. whatever you think about how long troops should remain in afghanistan. i think everybody thinks that's enough with that kind of commitment of u.s. forces overseas. >> is our mission to eliminate taliban? it never was our mission. it is nation building? is it sending children to school? is it building sewer systems? is it going after al-qaeda? so, all those factors are comp
. [ sniffles ] ♪ >> harris: breaking news now on the fox report and the pentagon confirming to fox news that retired general norman schwarzkopf has died. he commanded the coalition that pushed saddam hussein's forces out of kuwait in 1991. bob scales on the phone with us now. general scales you wrote a book called certain victory and you have a lot of knowledge of the history of the iraq war but personal knowledge with this man. you call him truly the first great american hero after vietnam. your thoughts? >> that is exactly right, harris. remember, i come from the same generation as general schwarzkopf and the vector was the vindication of my generation report vietnam generation because it was our first great military victory after defeat in vietnam and he took that personally. i knew general schwarzkopf well, going back to his time as a major in the pentagon. he also carried in his sack this rock that had the sigma that went with the defeat in vietnam. when defeated the iraqi military in the plains of iraq, when was able to do that one of the first things he said at the truce tent was
pretty hard things well. one is to lead the pentagon out of afghanistan, lead our military into redefining itself as to what does it do? why do you serve in the post-post-9/11 era? second, lead the country in more defense spending cuts, which is coming. and third thing is really to lead the nation through a discussion of what's our military for in the post-post-9/11 era? what's the role of counterterrorism? what are the limits of counterterrorism? what are we doing in asia? how do we work with our allies in china and asia? where has the pentagon taken powers that maybe need to go back to the civilian agencies? those are three enormous jobs that require you to work well with congress, to work well with the defense industry, to be trusted with our men and women in uniform and to have a really close relationship with the president. that's a big job description. >> so if we paint this sort of job description as guiding the pentagon through that period, it sounds like reimagining. how do you see the strengths and weakness of the front runners? >> the first thing to say about sen
confirmation vote in the senator, the decision to float hagel for the pentagon is having the opposite effect. >> i think this will be a very tough confirmation process. >> a lot of republicans are asking hard questions and i don't think he's going to get many republican votes. i think it would be a challenging nomination. >> in another distress signal for the white house, the former vietnam vet and nebraska senator was unable to secure the backing of the number three democrat in the senate. >> that's his choice. i think once he makes it, his record will be studied carefully, but until that point, i think we're not going to know what's going to happen. >> can you support him? >> i'd have to study his record. i'm not going to comment until the president makes a nomination. >> wow. schumer's was the sign of this nomination's downward trajectory. after watching on tv, mike allen wrote he received an immediate e-mail from an astute republican official saying, pass the jam, he's toast. so is it game over for hagel? the white house certainly seemed to be backtracking this weekend. a senior official
and they will be steep. of the $1.2 trillion in total spending cuts over nine years, $492 billion come from the pentagon. defense analysts say the impact on the military would be serious. >> the pentagon and the department are already in financial trouble. because there has already been $480 billion cut. to take another cut is devastating. >> it will make it channeling for the military to maintain the troops. equipment and preparedness. the larger defense industry also will be hit. >> severe budget cuts could put the natural security at risk if the company that make the f-35 fighter or artillery pieces don't have the money to keep going. >> my district would be adversely affected and defense spending cut by $8 billion. >> how did we get to this place? >> in budget battle, the 2011 spending cut put in as unthinkable trigger to force the lawmakers to find a way to cut spending. so far, they haven't found a way here we are. >> to make it unpalatable, they insist it comes out of the defense budget. conservatives think is much, much, much too har. >> defense secretary leon panetta said the pentagon has been
of hormuz as they conduct naval drills. cnn's pentagon correspondent chris lawrence is working on that story for us tonight. what do you make of it, chris? >> reporter: well, we have learned that at least one of them was an advance missile that was designed to go after ships in the area. another was an improved version of its surface-to-air missile designed to go after drones, fighter jets, anything that would be in the air. again, these are just exercises but any time you've got this sort of activity in the strait of hormuz, where 20% of the world's oil is transiting every day, you are going to have a lot of eyes on these exercises. >> let's remind everybody about the strait of hormuz. it is a very narrow strip through which all of the oil that is put on to tankers in the persian gulf has to travel through. pretty much everybody involved in the strait of hormuz has the potential to cause trouble to the other parties. iran has often threatened to close it, mine it and attack ships and the u.s. patrols the area and says if you ever even think about doing that, we will blow up your facilities.
in korea because the pentagon says two bridgeway coming or going to embarrass us in congress will start asking nasty questions. so rich i wanted to fire five of the six commanders in korea and they basically told and you can do it, they do it on the down low. pretend it's rotation. they basically say the chief of staff has lied to congress, so keep up the faÇade. release the tradition of relief partly because in the small and popular messy worse, it's harder to know what success looks like. you can be successful. it was clear to me that general petraeus was successful during the search in extricating from iraq, which was his true mission in getting us out of the war in one form or another. we've got an interesting point from a secondary theme of the book, which is civil military discourse. i want to give a shout out to two people, bob obuchi suffered through reading my manuscript twice in the senate general doo boat if he is here. there you are. jim dudek is the exception to every i'm saying tonight about generals by the way. a couple of things about jim dudek district may, now retired
the wall street journal, or the pentagon indicated they wanted to maintain 6000 to 15th thousand u.s. troops following 2014. that is the issue under discussion now. there's approximately around 340 0,000 afghan security forces in place, including the police. the pentagon recently indicated i don't believe there was a major unit capable of operating independently from nato support. there was some manipulation of the metrics they were using where the things appear to be making more progress than perhaps they were. that came out in a white paper. what will be the long term success or failure of the afghan national security forces is yet to be determined. they need about $4.1 billion a year to continue at that level, which is more than the entire government revenues in afghanistan. so it's gone to take a long-term commitment of foreign powers to maintain that size of armed forces. the afghans have proven that they are excellent fighters. the question is will they be excellent soldiers for the government of afghanistan? host: one other question, how stable do you think the karzai govern
pentagon budget issues coming up. so there's some talk about him wanting to hang on and try to manage the budget issues that are going to hit the pentagon over the next few months. host: we're taking your calls with david jackson, the white house reporter for u.s.a. today. first up is doug from oklahoma on the democratic line. good morning. caller: good morning. i had a question about geithner. hadn't he said something earlier about wanting to leave? guest: that's correct. host: around the inauguration was the quote. host: how would you feel about geithner leaving? do you want him to go as a democrat? caller: that's a good question. no. no. guest: the caller is right. geithner has said publicly he wants to leave around the nomination. but with the uncertainty, i don't think the administration would want him to leave as long as these issues are hanging. so we get a fiscal cliff this deal and i think he's going to be gone by the end of the month but i think it's kind of up t in the air. host: says a contender for his job would be jack lew. guest: that's the betting money. is his job if
and exchanges. >>> a bus bomb targeting. we are live from the pentagon with details. >>> his time has come again, a man from the '60s is getting a start again, lester chambers joins us back. >>> welcome back to "starting point." we've been talking about the blizzard and storm warnings from the deep south all the way to new england. we'll look at seymour, indiana, lexi sheen has drawn the short straw, she's from wlky and getting hammered. >> reporter: that's right, drew. things have calmed down. let me give you a look behind me. you can't see the tire tracks from where we came in 5:30 but the roadways are snow covered, two, two and a half inches have fallen since 4:00 this morning. we barely missed having a white christmas in seymour, indiana. indiana state police are advisi advising people to stay off the roads. they are urging everyone to stay home if it is at all possible and kind of a good day to do that. we were pointing out earlier this is the good snow, the stuff the kids like to play with, snowballs, snowmen, all of that good stuff but it is still dangerous. the roadway is slippery, slush
for the pentagon. defense cuts are coming in a big way. a look at world currencies and how they are holding up against the dollar. ♪ [ malennouncer ] it's tt me of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it findone, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all youeed is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. starsaving at citi.com/pricerewind. dagen: more good news for recovering the housing market. home prices in the 20 city index grew 4.3% from a year ago. chicago, new york were the only two cities with negative returns and october. starbucks urging washington to come together on the fiscal cliff. literally. the ceo is building employees that all d.c. area employees should write things on the cops. they want to serve as a rallying cry. of course, that is also a marketing ploy. you can get there from here
be a massive hit on the pentagon budget and what that means for our national defense. big deal. >> absolutely. thanks. joining us for a closer look at the fiscal cliff negotiations, ron johnson, a member of the appropriations and budget committees in the senate. thank you for taking a break from a busy time to visit with us. >> thank you. >> i want to get a response from the comments to the president. he said that g.o.p. can't take yes for an answer. is there an offer that would have been acceptable to the house or the senate g.o.p.? >> not that i am aware. people throw the numbers around, like there is a deal, $1 revenue for $3 spending cuts, i have never seen those deals. senator harry reid should have made sure the senate passed a budget, sometime in the past 3 years and that would be reconciled with the house and you would have a framework, you know, a budget resolution that the committee -- the appropriations committee, the house ways & means committee, senate finance committee, they would have the instructions to work on the difficult problems npublic. have a public debate. we are down
. by contrast, the international affairs budget is less than one-tenth of the pentagon's. secretary gates has spoken about this and strongly urged the congress to address that imbalance. we have not yet. admiral mullen pointed out, the more diplomacy is cut, the more lives are lost. we have to make certain that we are not penny-wise and pound-foolish when it comes to supporting americas vital overseas interests. adequately funding foreign-policy initiatives is not spending, but investing in our long-term security, and more often or not, it saves far more expensive expenditures in dollars and lives in the conflicts that we fail to see or avoid. we need to invest in america's long-term interest in order to do the job of diplomacy in a dangerous world. this report makes that crystal clear. since 1985, i have had the privilege of making official journeys to one trouble spot or another. i have met a lot of our men and women in the foreign services. we sat and talked about the work they do and the lives that they lead. they spent years learning the languages of the country so they can be on the fro
grew up on the pentagon papers, the secret history of the war, represent by daniel elsburg, is it true the papers were about vietnam was gaining territory. so perhaps by the '64 election this would have been major issue for kennedy, and he would have had to coming on more hawkish, again. >> counterfactual. we think kennedy had a certain kind of self-confidence. kennedy said at one opinion if somebody argues to me about unemployment, i can refute him. i have no problem. but somebody from the intelligence community or the military comes in, i always assume that they had a special knowledge that i didn't have. he says i've learned different. they really don't. he said at a later point, i'm going to tell my successor that the most important thing he has to learn is not trust the military, not to trust the joint chiefs. kennedy stood up to those people. >> in 2009, obama had the contrary result with the generals pressing him on afghanistan, the surge there. >> do you think -- i want to hear you talk about it -- has foreign policy in a grand sense changed at all since the colored war? it's b
to libya were killed. the report also finds fault with the pentagon and the white house. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge live with that from washington. is this report different from the one that the state department investigation group put out, catherine? >> reporter: it is, jon. thank you and good morning. this congressional investigation also faults the pentagon for having no effective evacuation plan and faults the white house including president obama for his inconsistent statements about whether benghazi was a terrorist attack given the intelligence suggested within hours that an al-qaida affiliate was involved on september 11th. it sites mr. obama a's interview with 60 minutes on september 12th as evidence of inconsistent statements. he states it's too early to know exactly how this came about, what group was involved. obviously it was an attack on americans and we will be working with the libyan government to make sure we bring these folks to justice one way or the other. the president said in an interview over the weekend that there were quote, huge problems and
the impact on the military overall will be, quote, very serious. >> the pentagon and the departments are already in financial trouble, because there has already been a $480 billion cut that is being applied right now as we speak. to take another cut on top of that is devastating. >> reporter: it's not just the military itself that will take a hit, also the defense industry, defense contractors, private companies that do work for the pentagon. one democratic congressman in northern virginia whose district maybe hit the hardest by all of this says it could mean layoffs. >> the large defense contractors will probably be okay, they have significant cash reserves, most of them. the smaller contractors would have trouble getting their lines of credit extended, trouble keeping their employees, if they can't be assured of continued employment. >> reporter: congressman moran says if we go over the cliff, which he thinks we will, then the impact and severity of the automatic defense spending cuts depend how long they are in place into the new year before congress finally fixes this fiscal clif
-the-board spending cuts set to start striking the pentagon and domestic agencies this week. so what do you think about the sequester? does it just kind of -- i don't want to use this phrase, but kick the can down the road? want after two months? >> we probably do this again. i'm not really sure why it's there. i'm not -- i don't understand who it's there to keep happy, who asked for the sequester delay. if it was the democrats, that's one thing, if it was the republicans, that's another. the house had a good plan to replace those sequester cuts with other, better cuts. so the sequester's going to be a big problem over here for those of us who are interested in reducing spending. heather: so i want to talk about whether this will, in fact, come up in the house today when they convene, i think it is noon unless that's changed. the house has informally operated under the hastert rule. basically, house gopers similarly will -- simply will not bring up a bill that does not have the majority party in the favor. even if it could pass with a colegislation of some of the members -- coalition of some of t
at the pentagon, thank you. >>> north korea kim jong undelivering the first new year's address in nearly two decades. mary snow has the latest. what's the latest, mary? >> kim jong-un is calling for an all out struggle and an easing of tensions with sourk but the young leader pralsed the controversial laurvelg. it was condemned by the united nations. we'll have much more on all of this just ahead in our next hour. >>> here in the u.s., many same-sex couples in maryland are ringing in the new year with wedding bells thanks to the new law that went into effect at midnight. >>> and we're pleased to announce the newest edition to the situation room family. he was born friday night to our very own producer melanie buck parks and our studio operator chris parks. he weighed in at 8 pounds, 13 ounces and joins his very excited big sister harper. all are happy, healthy, and we wish them only the very best. the great way to start the new year. >> beautiful, beautiful kids. lovely, lovely kids can. the newest members of our wolf pack here in "the situation room." thanks so much for that. >>> we're foll
countries to rethink. >> a pentagon report this past summer found that iran's ballistic missiles were becoming more accurate, versatile and more deadly than ever. for years u.s. intelligence officials circled the year 2015. they believe by then iran could test an intercontinental ballistic missile with a range of 3500 miles. >> this gives them the ability it to attack a new european countries, which giving them a degree of political influence in a crisis they might not otherwise have. >> the latest intelligence report from congress was just released in the last few weeks. it reassesses that estimate and concludes iran is not likely to test an icbm in the nix years. >> we're joined by chris lawrence in washington. chris, first of all, why the change? why is that? >> well, suzanne, basically the report says that economic sanctions are making it harder and harder for iran to get the necessary components and materials. it also shows that the iranians are not getting the help they need from russia and china, whose support has be dropping over the past ten years. remember, there's a big dif
sister that would cut half a bill kwroepb dollars from pentagon spending. the investment community seems to like it, the dow up 219 points. we'll keep and eye on it. >> reporter: the control room a brand-new hour straight ahead for ou. as you saw the markets enjoying the deal hashed out last night, lawmakers steering us away from the fiscal cliff but no shortage of road blocks on the horizon. what it all means, what is next for taxpayers, 77% of whom will see their taxes go up now. some of taxes tied to obama care new portions of the law kicking in on january 1st, a live report on who is paying more and for what. wait until you hear about a brand-new lawsuit that is being filed by a convicted killer who says the beer made me do it. he says the beer makers should have warned him that he'd become addicted and would go on to lead a life of crime. really? all of that and breaking news in the second hour of "happening now" now starts right now. jon: hi noon here on the east coast, there is new fallout from the fiscal cliff deal with tax times ahead. i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. we are
that i do not view this as the fall of the pentagon, but rather, an indication that the department of defense has insufficient assets to respond to attacks at this time -- of this type. let me comment on the administration's response to the attacks. this was so obviously a terrorist attack that i remain perplexed that the administration's officials gave such conflicting responses to questions from reporters about whether or not it was a terrorist attack. this was clearly not a peaceful protest that somehow got out of hand and evolved into a violent attack. instead, it clearly was a terrorist attack. and this, unfortunately, has been typical of what the committee has found over the last few years in our investigations of radical islamic extremism and the threat of the perversion of a peaceful religion practiced by the vast majority of muslims. the threat of the perversion of that etiology to attack our country remains a great threat. and yet, the administration repeatedly has refused to name the threat that we have faced. it was evident in the department of all land security -- home
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)